data&pubs-workshop-2016

Data & Publication Linking Workshop

Tuesday, January 5, 2016, Washington, D.C.

9:00am - 4:30pm, Harding Room, Washington Marriott Wardman Park

 

Overview

This workshop is funded by the NSF's Open Access & Open Data initiative to convene a discussion on the challenges and opportunities for cross-linking data and publication repositories. The workshop is bringing together a small group of experts and stakeholders from a range of sectors, including repository operators, scholarly publishers, and members of the scientific community. In bringing this diversity of perspectives together, we will inform community-based solutions to data and publication repository cross-linking challenges.

Workshop Information

Workshop Goals

- Present current initiatives focused on linking data and publications
- Discuss solutions to key cross-linking challenges
- Identify near-term activities that can be taken on by the relevant stakeholders

Meeting Logistics

The workshop took place on Tuesday, Jan 5, 2016, 9:00am - 4:30pm. The workshop venue was the Washington Marriott Wardman Park, 2660 Woodley Road NW, Washington, D.C.

For more information, please contact Matt Mayernik (mayernik at ucar.edu).

Background

The open availability and wide accessibility of scientific articles, data sets, and other digital resources is becoming the norm for 21st century science. Growing numbers of repositories of scientific resources enable researchers to discover, understand, and build upon previous work at greater scales than was previously possible. This workshop will investigate how repositories of related materials can interact to provide even further benefit to users. Many interrelationships exist between research articles, data, software, and other services used to produce scientific findings. Repositories for these resources, however, typically only supporting one particular kind of resource, or at most a couple of resource types, such as data and software. This has led to the siloing of information in a vast number of repositories. Producers and users of scientific resources would benefit from a more coherent network of repositories, in which repositories with different specializations and user communities work together at a technical and process level to provide greater services than any one repository can provide.

Acknowledgements

This workshop is funded by the NSF GEO Directorate: "EAGER: Repository Cross-Linking for Open Archiving and Sharing of Scientific Data and Articles", NSF award #1449668, PI Matthew Mayernik, Co-PI Don Middleton, University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) / National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR).